Sign of the times: Brunswick reports 4Q earnings loss

Probly the biggest name in billiards reports 4th quarter loss. …

Brunswick Corp. reported Thursday a net loss from continuing operations of $66.3 million during its fourth quarter, or 75 cents per diluted share, mainly due to marine sales that dropped 50 percent as the global marine marketplace continues to slow.

The quarter compared with net earnings of $12.1 million, or 14 cents per diluted share, for the same period in 2007.

The Lake Forest, Ill.-based company, the parent of Fond du Lac marine engine maker Mercury Marine, reported fourth-quarter sales of $837.7 million, down 42 percent from $1.44 billion the previous year. For the year ended Dec. 31, 2008, Brunswick had net sales of $4.7 billion, compared with $5.6 billion in 2007. The company had an operating loss for the year of $611.6 million, compared with operating earnings of $107.2 million the previous year.

For 2008, Brunswick had a net loss from continuing operations of $788.1 million, or $8.93 per diluted share, compared with net earnings from continuing operations of $79.6 million, or 88 cents per diluted share, in 2007.

The company’s boat segment, its largest operating group, experienced a 25 percent drop in sales during 2008 to $2 billion, down from $2.7 billion in 2007. Its marine engine segment, consisting of the Mercury Marine Group, reported a 17 percent decrease in net sales during 2008 to $1.9 billion, down from $2.3 billion in 2007.

Brunswick’s (NYSE: BC) billiards and bowling business, which has Wisconsin operations in Bristol, had total 2008 sales of $448.3 million, up slightly from a year ago. The segment had an operating loss for the year of $12.7 million, down from $16.5 million in 2007.

The billiards operation in Bristol is combined with Brunswick’s bowling segment, which includes bowling centers, equipment and products, billiards, air hockey and foosball tables.

“As we anticipated, 2008 proved to be a very challenging year for our businesses and we expect 2009 to also be difficult,” said Dustan McCoy, Brunswick’s chairman and CEO. “Although we have limited visibility to a very volatile marketplace entering the year, we expect our revenues to be lower in 2009 with higher relative percentage declines occurring in the first half of the year.”

Published in: on January 31, 2009 at 12:23 am  Leave a Comment  
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Unrest at Day 4 of Derby Billiards Event

Unrest at Day 4 of Derby Billiards Event
By admin
for InsidePOOLmag.com

Published: January 27, 2009
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Day 4 of the11th Annual Derby City Classic was shrouded in mystery due to continued technical issues being experienced at the tournament desk. To put it simply, there is very little way to know who is actually undefeated. Some people are still showing up undefeated that were eliminated from the tournament.

The final three players of the banks division are Johnathan Pinegar, Rudolofo Luat and John Brumback. Rudolfo is undefeated and awaiting the winner of Brumback and Pinegar in the finals.

Van Boening took down the legendary Efren “The Magician” Reyes in late night action at the Derby City Classic.
One highlight from the tournament action on Monday featured Corey Deuel forfeiting his one-pocket match. Deuel’s is scheduled to leave on Thursday and he was not planning to play in the 9-ball, but if he had done well in the banks and one-pocket then he was going to change his flight to stay and play in the 9 ball.

View the 11th Annual Derby City Classic Image Gallery
One highlight from the tournament action saw John Pinegar defeating Scott Frost after being down 2-0.

The Bank Division semis and finals have been rescheduled to Wednesday night instead of Tuesday because there are too many players in the one-pocket due to the technical issues. Many players are not happy and with many are speculating that they’re not coming back.

In late action, Shane Van Boening defeated Efren Reyes in a high-stakes challenge match, 23-19.

Published in: on January 28, 2009 at 12:13 am  Leave a Comment  
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Pool Tables

There are many sizes and styles of pool and billiard tables. Generally, tables are rectangles twice as long as they are wide. Most pool tables are known as 7-, 8-, or 9-footers, referring to the length of the table’s long side. Full-size snooker and English billiard tables are 12 feet (3.7 m) long on the longest side. Pool halls tend to have 9-foot (2.7 m) tables and cater to the serious pool player. Pubs will typically use 7-foot (2.1 m) tables which are often coin-operated. Formerly, 10-foot (3 m) tables were common, but such tables are now considered antique collectors items; a few, usually from the late 1800s, can be found in pool halls from time to time. Ten-foot tables remain the standard size for carom billiard games. The slates on modern carom tables are usually heated to stave off moisture and provide a consistent playing surface.

The length of the pool table will typically be a function of space, with many homeowners purchasing an 8-foot (2.4 m) table as a compromise. High quality tables are mostly 4.5 by 9 ft (2.7 m). (interior dimensions), with a bed made of three pieces of thick slate to prevent warping and changes due to humidity. Smaller bar tables are most commonly made with a single piece of slate. Pocket billiards tables normally have six pockets, three on each side (four corner pockets, and two side pockets).

Cloth
Main article: Baize

Women playing on an elaborately decorated green-covered table in an early 1880s advertising poster.All types of tables are covered with billiard cloth (often called “felt”, but actually a woven wool or wool/nylon blend called baize). Cloth has been used to cover billiards tables since the 15th century. In fact, the predecessor company of the most famous maker of billiard cloth, Iwan Simonis, was formed in 1453.

Bar or tavern tables, which get a lot of play, use “slower”, more durable cloth. The cloth used in upscale pool (and snooker) halls and home billiard rooms is “faster” (i.e. provides less friction, allowing the balls to roll farther across the table bed), and competition-quality pool cloth is made from 100 % worsted wool. Snooker cloth traditionally has a nap (consistent fiber directionality) and balls behave differently when rolling against versus along with the nap.

The cloth of the billiard table has traditionally been green, reflecting its origin (originally the grass of ancestral lawn games), and has been so colored since the 16th century.[6]

Rack
Main article: Rack (billiards)
A rack is the name given to a frame (usually wood or plastic) used to organize billiard balls at the beginning of a game. This is traditionally triangular in shape, but varies with the type of billiards played. There are two main types of racks; the more common triangular shape which is used for eight-ball and straight pool and the diamond shaped rack used for nine-ball.

Cues
Main article: Cue stick
Billiards games are mostly played with a stick known as a cue. A cue is usually either a one piece tapered stick or a two piece stick divided in the middle by a joint of metal or phenolic resin. High quality cues are generally two pieces and are made of a hardwood, generally maple for billiards and ash for snooker.

The butt end of the cue is of larger circumference and is intended to be gripped by a player’s hand. The shaft of the cue is of smaller circumference, usually tapering to an 0.4 to 0.55 inch (11–14 mm) terminus called a ferrule (usually made of fiberglass or brass in better cues), where a rounded leather tip is affixed, flush with the ferrule, to make final contact with balls. The tip, in conjunction with chalk, can be used to impart spin to the cue ball when it is not hit in its center.

Cheap cues are generally made of pine, low-grade maple (and formerly often of ramin, which is now endangered), or other low-quality wood, with inferior plastic ferrules. A quality cue can be expensive and may be made of exotic woods and other expensive materials which are artfully inlaid in decorative patterns. Many modern cues are also made, like golf clubs, with high-tech materials such as woven graphite. Skilled players may use more than one cue during a game, including a separate generally lighter cue for the opening break shot (because of cue speed gained from a lighter stick) and another, shorter cue with a special tip for jump shots.

Mechanical bridge
The mechanical bridge, sometimes called a “rake”, “bridge stick” or simply “bridge”, and “rest” in the UK, is used to extend a player’s reach on a shot where the cue ball is too far away for normal hand bridging. It consists of a stick with a grooved metal or plastic head which the cue slides on. Many amateurs refuse to use the mechanical bridge based on the perception that to do so is unmanly. However, many aficionados and most professionals employ the bridge whenever the intended shot so requires. Some players, especially current or former snooker players, use a screw-on cue butt extension instead of or in addition to the mechanical bridge. Bridge head design is varied, and not all designs (especially those with cue shaft-enclosing rings, or wheels on the bottom of the head), are broadly tournament-approved. In Italy a longer, thicker cue is typically available for this kind of tricky shot. Commonly in snooker they are available in three forms depending on how the player is hampered; the standard rest has a simple cross, the ‘spider’ has a raised arch around 12cm with three grooves to rest the cue in and for the most awkward of shots, the ‘giraffe’ which has a raised arch much like the ‘spider’ but with a slender arm reaching out around 15cm with the groove.

Chalk

Billiard chalk is applied to the tip of the cue.Chalk is applied to the tip of the cue stick, ideally before every shot, to increase the tip’s friction coefficient so that when it impacts the cue ball on a non-center hit, no miscue (unintentional slippage between the cue tip and the struck ball) occurs. Cue tip chalk is not actually the substance typically referred to as “chalk” (generally calcium carbonate, also known as calcite or carbonate of lime), but any of several proprietary compounds, with a silicate base. “Chalk” may also refer to a cone of fine, white hand chalk; like talc (talcum powder) it can be used to reduce friction between the cue and bridge hand during shooting, for a smoother stroke. Some brands of hand chalk actually are made of compressed talc. (Tip chalk is not used for this purpose because it is abrasive, hand-staining and difficult to apply.) Many players prefer a slick pool glove over hand chalk or talc because of the messiness of these powders; buildup of particles on the cloth will affect ball behavior and necessitate more-frequent cloth cleaning.

Cue tip chalk (invented in its modern form by straight rail billiard pro William A. Spinks and chemist William Hoskins in 1897)[7][8] is made by crushing silica and the abrasive substance corundum or aloxite[8] (aluminum oxide),[9][10] into a powder[8]. It is combined with dye (originally and most commonly green or blue-green, like traditional billiard cloth, but available today, like the cloth, in many colors) and a binder (glue).[8] Each manufacturer’s brand has different qualities, which can significantly affect play. High humidity can also impair the effectiveness of chalk. Harder, drier compounds are generally considered superior by most players.

Major games (carom and pocket)

Carom billiards table in a Parisian café.Main articles: Carom billiards and Pocket billiards
There are two main varieties of billiard games: carom and pocket. The main carom billiards games are straight billiards, balkline and three cushion billiards. All are played on a pocketless table with three balls; two cue balls and one object ball. In all, players shoot a cue ball so that it makes contact with the opponent’s cue ball as well as the object ball.

The most popular of the large variety of pocket games are eight-ball, nine-ball, one-pocket, bank pool, snooker and, among the old guard, straight pool. In eight-ball and nine-ball the object is to sink object balls until one can legally pocket the winning eponymous “money ball”. Well-known but waning in popularity is straight pool, in which players seek to continue sinking balls, rack after rack if they can, to reach a pre-determined winning score (typically 150). Related to nine-ball, another well-known game is rotation, where the lowest-numbered object ball on the table must be struck first, although any object ball may be pocketed (i.e., combination shot). Each pocketed ball is worth its number, and the player with the highest score at the end of the rack is the winner. Since there are only 120 points available (1 + 2 + 3 ⋯ + 15 = 120), scoring 61 points leaves no opportunity for the opponent to catch up. In both one-pocket and bank pool, the players must sink a set number of balls; respectively, all in a particular pocket, or all by bank shots. In snooker, players score points by alternately potting red balls and various special “colour balls”.

Man playing billiards with a cue and a woman with mace, from an illustration appearing in Michael Phelan’s 1859 book, The Game of Billiards.
Straight rail or straight billiards
Main article: Balkline and straight rail
In straight rail, a player scores a point and may continue shooting each time his cue ball makes contact with both other balls.

Although a difficult and subtle game, some of the best players of straight billiards developed the skill to gather the balls in a corner or along the same rail for the purpose of playing a series of nurse shots to score a seemingly limitless number of points.

The first straight rail professional tournament was held in 1879 where Jacob Schaefer, Sr. scored 690 points in a single turn[6] (that is, 690 separate strokes without a miss). With the balls repetitively hit and barely moving in endless “nursing”, there was little for the fans to watch.

Balkline
Main article: Balkline and straight rail
In light of these phenomenal skill developments in straight rail, the game of balkline soon developed to make it impossible for a player to keep the balls gathered in one part of the table for long, greatly limiting the effectiveness of nurse shots. A balkline (not to be confused with baulk line, which pertains to the game of English billiards) is a line parallel to one end of a billiards table. In the games of balkline – 18.1 and 18.2 (pronounced “eighteen-point-two”) balkline, among other more obscure variations – the players have to drive at least one object ball past a balkline set at 18 inches from each rail, after one or two points have been scored, respectively.

Three-cushion billiards
Main article: Carom billiards#Three-cushion billiards
A more elegant solution was three-cushion billiards, which requires a player to make contact with the other two balls on the table and contact three rail cushions in the process. This is difficult enough that even the best players can only manage to average one to two points per turn.

English billiards
Main article: English billiards
Dating to approximately 1800, English billiards is a hybrid of carom and pocket billiards played on a 6-foot (1.8 m) by 12-foot (3.7 m) table. Like most carom games, it requires two cue balls and a red object ball. The object of the game is to score either a fixed number of points, or score the most points within a set time frame, determined at the start of the game.

Points are awarded for:

Two-ball Cannons: striking both the object ball and the other (opponent’s) cue ball on the same shot (2 points)
Winning hazards: potting the red ball (3 points); potting the other cue ball (2 points)
Losing hazards (or “in-offs”): potting one’s cue ball by cannoning off another ball (3 points if the red ball was hit first; 2 points if the other cue ball was hit first, or if the red and other cue ball were “split”, i.e. hit simultaneously).

Snooker
Main article: Snooker
A pocket billiards game originated by British officers stationed in India during the 19th century. The name of the game became generalized to also describe one of its prime strategies: to “snooker” the opposing player by causing that player to foul or leave an opening to be exploited.

In the United Kingdom, snooker is by far the most popular cue sport at the competitive level. It is played in many other countries as well. Snooker is far rarer in the U.S., where pool games such as eight-ball and nine-ball dominate. The first International Snooker Championship was held in 1927, and it has been held annually since then with few exceptions. The World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association (WPBSA) was established in 1968 to regulate the professional game, while the International Billiards and Snooker Federation (IBSF) regulates the amateur games(see Wikipedia, ‘Snooker’).

Eight-ball
Main article: Eight-ball

Eight-ball rackIn the United States, the most commonly-played game is eight-ball. The goal of eight-ball, which is played with a full rack of fifteen balls and the cue ball, is to claim a suit (commonly stripes or solids in the US, and reds or yellows in the UK), pocket all of them, then legally pocket the 8 ball, while denying one’s opponent opportunities to do the same with their suit, and without sinking the 8 ball early by accident. On the professional scene, eight-ball players on the International Pool Tour (IPT) were the highest paid players in the world as of 2006 (the IPT nearly folded in 2007, and as of 2008 is attempting a comeback). In the United Kingdom the game is commonly played in pubs, and it is competitively played in leagues on both sides of the Atlantic. The most prestigious tournaments including the World Open are sponsored and sanctioned by the International Pool Tour. Rules vary widely from place to place (and between continents to such an extent that British-style eight-ball pool/blackball is properly regarded as a separate game in its own right). Pool halls in North America are increasingly settling upon the World Pool-Billiard Association International Standardised Rules. But tavern eight-ball (also known as “bar pool”), typically played on smaller, coin-operated tables and in a “winner keeps the table” manner, can differ significantly even between two venues in the same city. The growth of local, regional and national amateur leagues may alleviate this confusion eventually.

Nine-ball
Main article: Nine-ball
Nine-ball uses only the 1 through 9 balls and cue ball. It is a rotation game: The player at the table must make legal contact with the lowest numbered ball on the table or a foul is called. The game is won by legally pocketing the nine ball. Nine-ball is the predominant professional game, though as of 2006–2008 there have been some suggestions that this may change, in favor of ten-ball.[11][clarification needed] There are many local and regional tours and tournaments that are contested with nine-ball. The World Pool-Billiard Association (WPA), and it American affiliate the Billiard Congress of America (BCA), publish the World Standardized Rules. The European professional circuit has instituted rules changes, especially to make it more difficult to achieve a legal break shot.[11][12] The largest nine-ball tournaments are the independent US Open Nine-ball Championship and the WPA World Nine-ball Championship for men and women. Male professionals have a rather fragmented schedule of professional nine-ball tournaments. The United States Professional Pool Players Association (UPA) has been the most dominant association of the 1990s and 2000s. A hotly contested event is the annual Mosconi Cup, which pits invitational European and US teams against each other in one-on-one and scotch doubles nine-ball matches over a period of several days. The Mosconi Cup games are played under the more stringent European rules, as of 2007.[12]

Three-ball
Main article: Three-ball
A variant using only three balls, generally played such that the player at turn continues shooting until all the balls are pocketed, and the player to do so in the fewest shots wins. The game can be played by two or more players. Dispenses with some fouls common to both nine- and eight-ball.

One-pocket
Main article: One-pocket
One-pocket is a strategic game for two players. Each player is assigned one of the corner pockets on the table. This is the only pocket into which he can legally pocket balls. The first player to pocket the majority of the balls (8) in his pocket wins the game. The game requires far more defensive strategy than offensive strategy, much unlike eight-ball, nine-ball, or straight pool. It has been said[weasel words] that if eight-ball is checkers, one-pocket is chess. This statement can be verified by watching a game of one pocket. Most times, accomplished players choose to position balls near their pocket instead of trying to actually pocket them. This allows them to control the game by forcing their opponent to be on defense instead of taking a low percentage shot that could result in a loss of game. These low percentage shots are known as “flyers” by one pocket aficionados.

Bank pool
Main article: Bank pool
Bank pool has been gaining popularity in recent years. Bank pool can be played with a full rack (can be a long game), but is more typically played with nine balls (frequently called “nine-ball bank”). The balls are racked in nine-ball formation, but in no particular order. The object of the game is simple: to be the first player to bank five balls in any order (eight balls when played with a full rack). Penalties and fouls are similar to one pocket in that the player committing the foul must spot a ball for each foul. This must be done before the incoming player shoots.

Published in: on January 28, 2009 at 12:10 am  Leave a Comment  
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Derby City Billiards Event Continues

by InsidePOOL Staff

Day 1 of the 2009 Derby City Classic went off without a hitch. In fact, “it almost went too well because we finished too fast,” said Paul Smith with Diamond Billiards. Allotted match times are based on the average match lengths from the previous year. Last year, the average bank pool match took 1.14 hours. This year’s average matches have not been taking nearly as long. “I truly believe the general caliber of bank play has improved,” said Smith.

One hundred and ninety-nine matches were played on forty tables in less than nine hours. Round two and the first redraw began at 11 a.m. this morning. Nick Varner, Dave Matlock, and Larry Price are a handful of the previous champs that are not currently present this year.

Brian Gregg repeated his Derby City Classic Bank Ring Game performance.
The bank pool ring game also kicked off at 8 o’clock. Limited to only six players, Tony Chohan showed up two minutes too late. Announcer Grady Matthews was just signing up Glenn “Piggy Banks” Rogers, first on the waiting list, to fill his spot. The complete list of competitors included Brian Gregg, Shannon Daulton, Louis D’Marco, Darrell Abernathy, Jason Miller, and Rogers.

Bank pool ring game rules: $50 / ball initially. Stakes rose to $100, $200, $400, $600, then $1,000 based on the two-and-a-half hour timeframe. In the ring game, kicking at a ball is allowed with a minimum of two rails. The buy-in this year was reduced to $1,500 from the previous $3,000 to encourage more entries.

Published in: on January 26, 2009 at 8:12 am  Leave a Comment  
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And The Winner is “Gary Empey” wins CNY Billiards Title

Central New York 9-Ball Tour / Fairmount, NY

by Skip Maloney

Faced with a second set in a true double-elimination finals on the CNY 9-Ball Tour stop the weekend of January 24-25, the two finalists, Gary Empey and Jim Forsythe, opted for a single-game set to decide the match. Empey won that single game and came home with the first place prize. The $390-added, A-B handicapped event, hosted by Corky’s Billiards in Fairmount, NY, drew 44 entrants.

Empey had bested Jeremy Leander 9-3 from among the winners’ side final four, as Forsythe sent Dominic Martoccia west 7-3. In the hot seat match that followed, Empey, a Double-A + 2 player, had to reach 9 games before Forsythe, a Double-A, had to reach 7 games. Both reached the hill–Forsythe at 6 games, Empey at 8–before Forsythe finished it, gaining the hot seat and waiting for Empey’s return.

Leander and Martoccia lasted only a single round on the one-loss side, as Jose Mendez and Lyn Wechsler dropped them into the tie for fifth place and faced each other in the quarterfinals. It was Wechsler advancing to the semifinals with a 7-3 win over Mendez. Empey gave up only three racks in the semifinals that followed and turned to face Forsythe a second time.

Empey gave up even less in the first set of the finals, defeating Forsythe 9-2. It was at that point that the two decided to make it a single-game final set. Empey completed his single-defeat weekend to capture the first-place prize.

Gary Empey and Jim Forsythe, opted for a single-game set to decide the final match.
Results:
1st Gary Empey $400
2nd Jim Forsythe $285
3rd Lyn Wechsler $200
4th Jose Mendez $150
5th Jeremy Leander $120
Dominic Martoccia
7th Dan Smith $80
Paul Merluzzi
9th Jeff Montgomery $40
Chris Handzel
John McConnell
Dave Grau

Published in: on January 26, 2009 at 8:10 am  Leave a Comment  

Billiards History As A Sport

At least the games with regulated international professional competition have been referred to as “sports” or “sporting” events, not simply “games”, since 1893 at the latest.[3] Quite a variety of particular games (i.e. sets of rules and equipment) are the subject of present-day competition, including many of those already mentioned, with competition being especially broad in nine-ball, snooker, three-cushion and eight-ball.

Snooker, though technically a pocket billiards variant and closely related in its equipment and origin to the game of English billiards, is a professional sport organized at the international level, and its rules bear little resemblance to those of pool games.

A “Billiards” category encompassing pool, snooker and carom was featured in the 2005 World Games, held in Duisburg, Germany, and the 2006 Asian Games also saw the introduction of a “Cue sports” category.

Billiards History

All cue sports are generally regarded to have evolved into indoor games from outdoor stick-and-ball lawn games (retroactively termed ground billiards) [2], and as such to be related to troco, croquet and golf, and more distantly to the stickless bocce and bowling. The word “billiard” may have evolved from the French word billart, meaning “mace”, an implement similar to a golf club, which was the forerunner to the modern cue. The term “cue sports” can be used to encompass the ancestral mace games, and even the modern cueless variants, such as finger pool, for historical reasons….

Accordingly, in addition to the three general subdivisions listed earlier, a now rare obstacle category was prevalent in early times.

The early croquet-like games eventually led to the development of the carom or carambole billiards category – what most non-US and non-UK speakers mean by the word “billiards”. These games, which once completely dominated the cue sports world but have declined markedly in most areas over the last few generations, are games played with three or sometimes four balls, on a table without holes (or obstructions in most cases, five-pins being an exception), in which the goal is generally to strike one object (target) ball with a cue ball, then have the cue ball rebound off of one or more of the cushions and strike a second ball. Variations include three-cushion, straight rail, balkline variants, cushion caroms, Italian five-pins, and four-ball, among others.

Over time, a type of obstacle returned, originally as a hazard and later as a target, in the form of pockets, or holes partly cut into the table bed and partly into the cushions, leading to the rise of pocket billiards, especially “pool” games, popular around the world in forms such as eight-ball, nine-ball, straight pool and one-pocket amongst numerous others. The terms “pool” and “pocket billiards” are now virtually interchangeable, especially in the US. English billiards (what UK speakers almost invariably mean by the word “billiards”) is a hybrid carom/pocket game, and as such is likely fairly close to the ancestral original pocket billiards outgrowth from 18th to early 19th century carom games.

Published in: on January 24, 2009 at 5:23 am  Leave a Comment  
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Cue sports

“Billiards” redirects here. For other uses, see Billiard.
Illustration of a three ball pocket billiards game in early 19th century Tübingen, Germany, using a table much longer than the modern type.

Cue sports (sometimes spelled cuesports) are a wide variety of games of skill generally played with a cue stick which is used to strike billiard balls, moving them around a cloth-covered billiards table bounded by rubber cushions.

Historically, the umbrella term was billiards. While that familiar name is still employed by some as a generic label for all such games, the word’s usage has splintered into more exclusive competing meanings among certain groups and geographic regions. In the United Kingdom, “billiards” refers exclusively to English billiards, while in the United States it is sometimes used to refer to a particular game or class of games, or to all cue games in general, depending upon dialect and context.

There are three major subdivisions of games within cue sports:

* Carom billiards, referring to games played on tables without pockets, including among others balkline and straight rail, cushion caroms, three-cushion billiards and artistic billiards
* Pocket billiards (or “pool”) generally played on a table with six pockets, including among others eight-ball (the world’s most widely played cue sport), nine-ball, straight pool, one-pocket and bank pool.
* Snooker, which while technically a pocket billiards game, is generally classified separately based on its historic divergence from other games, as well as a separate culture and terminology that characterize its play.

More obscurely, there are games that make use of obstacles and targets, and table-top games played with disks instead of balls.

Billiards has a long and rich history stretching from its inception in the 15th century; to the wrapping of the body of Mary, Queen of Scots in her billiard table cover in 1586; through its many mentions in the works of Shakespeare, including the famous line “let us to billiards” in Antony and Cleopatra (1606–07); to the dome on Thomas Jefferson’s home Monticello, which conceals a billiard room he hid, as billiards was illegal in Virginia at that time; and through the many famous enthusiasts of the sport including, Mozart, Louis XIV of France, Marie Antoinette, Immanuel Kant, Napoleon, Abraham Lincoln, Mark Twain, George Washington, French president Jules Grévy, Charles Dickens, George Armstrong Custer, Theodore Roosevelt, Lewis Carroll, W.C. Fields, Babe Ruth, Bob Hope, Jackie Gleason, and many others.

Published in: on January 24, 2009 at 5:22 am  Leave a Comment  
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BILLIARDS: Significant win keeps title race

CROWLAND B kept the Spalding and District League title race alive by beating leaders Crowland A.
Rob Childs (O200) and Derek Tinkler (O20) were both victorious for the B side in a 5-2 win, cutting the gap at the top to just six points.

Cue ace Childs overcame a mammoth 300 handicap to beat Alan Readshaw (R100) 200-175, making breaks of 54, 46
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and 45.

Tinkler’s 200-181 win over Marian Lee (R110) saw him make a 28 break – and made Tom Lee’s (R90) win over Roger Goodliffe (R80) pure consolation.

But the fortunes were reversed in the KO Shield two days later, Crowland’s A team cruising past Pyramid A 541-497 while the B team were being dumped out by Holbeach 523-538.

Gosberton A missed the chance to make up ground at the top.

Consti C beat them 5-2, with Peter Tingle (R100) and Mick Peet (R120) picking up wins.

Their slip-up allowed Pyramid C to move alongside them on 69 points, thanks to a 5-2 derby win over Pyramid A.

John Templeman (R40) made a 40 break for the A team, but Max Ayliff’s (R70) 29 helped guide the C team to glory.

Both they and Consti C are nine points off the pace.

Meanwhile, BSC veteran Hugh Pinner (150) comfortably made the top break of the week in his side’s 5-2 home triumph over Pyramid B.

Pinner racked up a huge 116 as he sunk James Sharpe (R80), with Brian Bowell (R20) also on winning form.

Darrell Read (R50) won to secure two points for the Bourne side, making breaks of 21 and 20.

It was a good week for Read, as he went on to net the decisive points in Pyramid B’s 563-411 Shield win over Consti B.

The week wasn’t all bad for Consti B, as Mick Johnson (O150) won a thrilling clash with Alan Nichols (R110) to clinch a 5-2 win over Gosberton.

Johnson made breaks of 74, 40 and 23 en route to edging a 200-198 win.

Published in: on January 24, 2009 at 5:19 am  Leave a Comment  
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Its now the 12th and the weekends over

I went out this weekend to a local pub and played pool with a couple of friends of mine and you know i noticed is that if you own your pool cue your expected to be a pro player, its not like if i bring a basket ball to a basket ball court im expected to dunk ill admit i do use a very nice pool cue Click The Link to see the one i personaly own.

But anyways i play a game with a guy thats in this pub and he does a pretty good job of spanking me he was actually pretty good but he brings up the fact that i own my pool cue and i dont know how to play wich im not terrible but im not the greatest player in the world but im far from the worst so anyways i give him another oportunity to play again and i just wallup him i get him pretty good but anyways im not really sure what the point of my story is just thought i would say what i say.

Published in: on January 12, 2009 at 9:26 am  Leave a Comment